Blogging Isn’t Dead – It’s Just Boring

Blogging isn’t dead; it’s just become boring. There I said it. Blogging is – or rather, blogs are – boring.  

The funny thing is most of the blog posts I’ve seen declaring that blogging is a dead art form are from the ‘big’ bloggers. The ones who have thousands of followers across the social media channels and whose blog readers hang on to their every word. Side note: I’ve read a post on this by a big blogger who was saying that ‘nobody reads blogs anymore. Nobody sits and scrolls through bloglovin’ to find a post they want to read. Nobody has time for blogs’ and I remember being angry because I do that. I have time for blogs and I know there are still loads of people out there who do too. These same bloggers are usually the ones who don’t reply to messages or Instagram comments or comment on the blog posts they’ve enjoyed – if they’re even still reading other people’s blogs at all. 

I think these things are linked.  

I mean no disrespect to big bloggers, or to anyone who genuinely thinks blogging is a dying industry, I’ve just noticed a bit of a trend. Many of these posts talk about the community in the good old days where you knew everyone and you’d have a group of blogger pals who would comment on your posts without fail, and you’d return the favour. They talk about how blogging is now all about what you can take from readers (money, comments, an uplifting feeling) and how nobody wants to hype others up anymore. There’s too much competition.  

And I get that, I really do, but these people are often some of the people who are contributing to that very change. They have their blogger friends but these are usually others who have thousands of followers and who also only keep to their tight-knit circle. They don’t hype smaller, newer bloggers up. They only notice you if you’re Instagram feed is glossy and your blog looks like a magazine. But what if that just isn’t you?

Blogging seems dead because there are so many platforms to choose from now, from Instagram to podcasts. People are inundated with content that they must feel very overwhelmed, and that leaves content creators vying for that top spot and trying to stand out and be noticed. The thing is though, the stuff that gets noticed (the stuff posted by those big bloggers with a huge following), isn’t necessarily that interesting (#sorrynotsorry), it’s just that they have such a big fan base that of course it’s going to be popular. It’s the law of probability. But other, smaller bloggers see that as being widely read and shared and try to imitate in their content. This is in no way a criticism; I do it too. Everyone wants to be noticed, even if you’re not interested in blogging for a living, because blogging is a lot of work. Of course you’re going to try and do what it looks like everyone wants to read. But this leads to blogs all looking the same. Who is honestly going to read the same post over and over again? With the sheer number of bloggers now though, it is incredibly difficult to stand out and produce unique content, and it’s very difficult to know what it is people want to read.  

The other thing is something that I have alluded to above. Unless it’s a blog by an influencer who has become known in the public eye, blogs are mainly read by other bloggers and there isn’t a blogging community like there once was. The vast number of people who write a blog now means it’s hard to keep track of who you enjoy reading and it’s impossible to comment on every post you like. That mixed in with this new ‘get rich quick’ attitude many people have thanks to the rise in prominence of bigger bloggers means it’s seen as more of a competition. 

I don’t have any big answers for what we should do to rectify this, but I will say that I do not think blogging is dead. Far from it. It is now being seen as a serious career and one that is accessible by most people. 

I do, however, think that it is a little too competitive sometimes. I know that I often feel a pang of jealousy when I see people who have only been blogging for a year get thousands of followers and have press trips and PR packages thrown at them daily. But then I remember that they have probably put in a hell of a lot more work than I have. If you’re taking it seriously and want to make this a career, then you need to get swept up in that competition. 

If you’re a hobby blogger you can’t realistically expect huge numbers. Instead of trying to please everyone and stand out in order to gain thousands of views daily, you need to find your tribe. Find a smaller group of people who lift you up and hype up your content. Find people you want to chat to daily and who you genuinely get excited about seeing their name pop up on your feed. That’s the essence of blogging and finding a smaller community will make it feel more alive than ever before.  

Blogging needs to be separated into big and small, career and hobby, before you can talk about it being dead. In this digital age blogging will only continue to grow, not die. As long as the internet exists, there will be a place for blogs. There always has been and there always will be. They may not look like they do now, or like they did five years ago, but they will be there. Blogging is also what you make of it. Find your community, find what you want to write about, find your photography style and just have fun with it.

The fewer people you’re trying to please with your content, the more people will want to read what you have to say.

What are your thoughts? Do you think blogging is dying or is 2019 the year of the blog as some people are saying? Do you still go looking for blogs to read? Let me know in the comments!

Want to see more? You can follow me on social media:

Twitter || Instagram || Pinterest || Bloglovin’

sign off



8 thoughts on “Blogging Isn’t Dead – It’s Just Boring”

  • Oh wow! This was a lot to swallow lol. In my opinion I think blogging is what you make it. I put a lot of work in for my content and just my love for writing and taking photos in general so that’s me. However, I do understand your view on bloggers with larger than usual following who look down on new bloggers, that’s ridiculous. The blogging world is only as dead as we make it. If it’s aomethinf we love doing, then there’s no need for comparison or competition. I just stick to doing what I know and love. I form blogger groups to help bloggers like me who are under that 5-10k mark! So that’s my part💕💕

    • I completely agree! I love doing what I do too and it definitely is what you make it. I feel like there’s just too much competition sometimes and not enough love aha it’s great that you form groups for smaller bloggers

  • I have a feeling that a lot of these big bloggers think of blogging as dying because it’s dying out *for them*.

    They no longer have the time to sit and scroll through blogs or read detailed posts about book reviews or SEO tips because they’re too busy being influencers and selling products or going to photo shoots or conferences or what have you…and that’s fine. But I think some of them need to remember that their experiences and success are unique to them and that other bloggers can and do operate in a different manner – by maintaining support for the community and networking in that way!

    We all do our part to keep blogging alive!

    • Exactly! They seem to forget what blogging is like when you don’t have this huge following and that other people do things differently

  • I agree with you – there is a difference between hobby bloggers and bloggers who want to make this into a career. I also feel that big bloggers shouldn’t whine as much as they sometimes do, it’s hardly my fault when they lose contact to their own community and create almost copy-paste content while losing their voice ….

    • Yes to all of this! It seems like blogging is dead to the people who have stopped making the effort with their community

  • I mostly agree with you. I used to blog a lot and I had a semi decent Twitter following etc but I found myself just trying to fit in and get popularity points. I ended up getting fed up and chucked it in, took some time out and now I’m back. I wrote what I want, in my own style and if people like it, great. If they don’t, I’m not so bothered.

    • I get that, it must be quite easy to fall into the trap of writing what seems to be doing well for others as your following grows. There’s a lot of pressure there

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

80 + = 82


%d bloggers like this: